The Rev. David Chilton Center http://chiltoncenter.org for Reformed Theology Sat, 15 Jul 2017 21:49:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.2 for Reformed Theology The Rev. David Chilton Center The Rev. David Chilton Center © 2013. All Rights Reserved. for Reformed Theology The Rev. David Chilton Center http://chiltoncenter.org/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://chiltoncenter.org TV-G Georgetown, California Successful Management – Proverbs 13 http://chiltoncenter.org/successful-management-proverbs-13/ Wed, 04 Feb 2015 07:58:25 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=99 God requires basic management of our life and God’s word gives us principles that apply to any and every area of responsibility. Pastor Chilton outlines principles of successful management based on Proverbs 13. Proverbs 13 King James Version (KJV) 1 A wise son heareth his father’s instruction: but a scorner heareth not rebuke. 2 A […]

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God requires basic management of our life and God’s word gives us principles that apply to any and every area of responsibility. Pastor Chilton outlines principles of successful management based on Proverbs 13.

Proverbs 13 King James Version (KJV)

1 A wise son heareth his father’s instruction: but a scorner heareth not rebuke.

2 A man shall eat good by the fruit of his mouth: but the soul of the transgressors shall eat violence.

3 He that keepeth his mouth keepeth his life: but he that openeth wide his lips shall have destruction.

4 The soul of the sluggard desireth, and hath nothing: but the soul of the diligent shall be made fat.

5 A righteous man hateth lying: but a wicked man is loathsome, and cometh to shame.

6 Righteousness keepeth him that is upright in the way: but wickedness overthroweth the sinner.

7 There is that maketh himself rich, yet hath nothing: there is that maketh himself poor, yet hath great riches.

8 The ransom of a man’s life are his riches: but the poor heareth not rebuke.

9 The light of the righteous rejoiceth: but the lamp of the wicked shall be put out.

10 Only by pride cometh contention: but with the well advised is wisdom.

11 Wealth gotten by vanity shall be diminished: but he that gathereth by labour shall increase.

12 Hope deferred maketh the heart sick: but when the desire cometh, it is a tree of life.

13 Whoso despiseth the word shall be destroyed: but he that feareth the commandment shall be rewarded.

14 The law of the wise is a fountain of life, to depart from the snares of death.

15 Good understanding giveth favour: but the way of transgressors is hard.

16 Every prudent man dealeth with knowledge: but a fool layeth open his folly.

17 A wicked messenger falleth into mischief: but a faithful ambassador is health.

18 Poverty and shame shall be to him that refuseth instruction: but he that regardeth reproof shall be honoured.

19 The desire accomplished is sweet to the soul: but it is abomination to fools to depart from evil.

20 He that walketh with wise men shall be wise: but a companion of fools shall be destroyed.

21 Evil pursueth sinners: but to the righteous good shall be repayed.

22 A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children’s children: and the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just.

23 Much food is in the tillage of the poor: but there is that is destroyed for want of judgment.

24 He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes.

25 The righteous eateth to the satisfying of his soul: but the belly of the wicked shall want.

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God requires basic management of our life and God’s word gives us principles that apply to any and every area of responsibility. Pastor Chilton outlines principles of successful management based on Proverbs 13. God requires basic management of our life and God’s word gives us principles that apply to any and every area of responsibility. Pastor Chilton outlines principles of successful management based on Proverbs 13. Proverbs 13 King James Version (KJV) 1 A wise son heareth his father’s instruction: but a scorner heareth not rebuke. 2 A […] The Rev. David Chilton Center 45:04
Christian Socialism During the Reformation http://chiltoncenter.org/christian-socialism-reformation/ Wed, 05 Feb 2014 21:52:43 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=89 The term for revolutionary socialism during the Reformation was Anabaptism. The Anabaptists, while they claimed to be “true” Christians, denied virtually all the content of the faith. They rejected biblical law, rebelled against the Church’s government, ministry, worship, and sacraments, and turned from orthodoxy to a multitude of heretical doctrines. They were forthrightly socialist, using […]

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The term for revolutionary socialism during the Reformation was Anabaptism. The Anabaptists, while they claimed to be “true” Christians, denied virtually all the content of the faith.

They rejected biblical law, rebelled against the Church’s government, ministry, worship, and sacraments, and turned from orthodoxy to a multitude of heretical doctrines. They were forthrightly socialist, using the old techniques of envy- and guilt-manipulation: “It is impossible to be Christian and wealthy at the same time,” they proclaimed. Thus they formed Christian communes, in which all possessions-yes, wives. too-were shared among the Brethren, and from which they published their radical, egalitarian dogmas: “Therefore it ought to be that all authorities, secular and clerical, be deprived of their offices once and for all or be killed by the sword . . .”

Thomas_Muntzer

Thomas_Muntzer

The stories of two important Anabaptist leaders, Thomas Muntzer (or Munzer) and John of Leyden, are crucial for an understanding ofthe nature of Christian Socialism, and a likely intimation of where it is headed in the future. Miintzer and John of Leyden are given extended treatment by Shafarevich in a twenty- page, small-print appendix to his chapter on the heresies. Muntzer, a vagrant preacher and organizer of conspiracies, early established a pattern of rebellion against authorities in the name of Christ. After many escapades and scrapes with the law, he finally established a revolutionary base in Miihlhausen, Germany, from whence he issued proclamations damning landowners, magistrates, and the Reformers (“I would like to smell your frying car- cass,” he wrote to Luther).

Friedrich Engels summarized Muntzer’s doctrines: “Under the cloak of Christianity he preached a kind of pantheism, which curiously resembled modem speculative contemplation and at times even approached atheism. He repudiated the Bible both as the only and as the infallible revelation. The real and living revelation, he said, was reason, a revelation which existed and always exists among all peoples at all times. To hold up the Bible against reason, he maintained, was to kill the spirit with the letter, for the Holy Spirit of which the Bible speaks is not something that exists outside us- the Holy Spirit is our reason. Faith is nothing butreason come alive in man, and pagans could therefore also have faith. Through this faith, through reason come to life, man be- came godlike and blessed. Heaven is, therefore, nothing of another world and is to be sought in this life. It is the mission of believers to establish this Heaven, the kingdom of God, here on earth. Just as there is no Heaven in the beyond, there is also no hell and no damnation. Similarly, there is no devil but man’s evil lusts and greed. Christ was a man, as we are, a prophet and a teacher, and his supper is a plain meal of commemoration wherein bread and wine are consumed without any mystic garnish.”

Engels explained that ”by the kingdom of God Munzer meant a society without class differences, private property and a state au- thority independent of, and foreign to, the members of society. All the existing authorities, insofar as they refused to submit and join the revolution, were to be overthrown, all work and all property shared in common, and complete equality introduced.” And he makes this highly significant observation: “Munzer preached these doctrines mostly cloaked in the same Christian phraseology, behind which the new philosophy had to hide for some time.” By using superficially biblical language, Muntzer was able to gain a following among many who might have repudiated his damnable doctrine if it had been presented in the clear light of day as a call to envy and mass murder.

Muntzer created an army of citizens, which enforced his doctrine of equality upon the countryside by what Engels praised as its “robust vandalism”: robbing, burning, and destroying the property of the rich. “Let your swords be ever warm with blood!” Muntzer exhorted the faithful. In 1525 he was successful in rousing up all of central Germany in the bloody, so-called “Peasant Rebellion” (although, it must be carefully noted, he attracted several nobles to his side). The rebellion was eventually put down and Muntzer was executed; Luther said, “Whoever has seen Muntzer can say that he has seen the devil in the flesh, at his most ferocious.” That was before Luther saw Jan Bokelson – better known to history as Johann (or John) of Leyden.

Jan Matthijs

Jan Matthijs

Bokelson began his career as the disciple of the Anabaptist leader Jan Matthijs (or Matthys), who took over the town of Munster in 1534. Shafarevich describes the scene: “Armed Anabaptists broke into houses and drove out everyone who was unwilling to accept second baptism. Winter was drawing to a close; it was a stormy day and wet snow was falling. An eyewitness account describes crowds of expelled citizens walking through the knee-deep snow. They had not been allowed even to take warm clothing with them, women carrying children in their arms, old men leaning on staffs. At the city gate they were robbed once more.”

But those were the lucky ones. They, at least, escaped the reign of terror which followed, as Matthijs and Bokelson ordered the socialization of all property and ordained apostles of revolution to preach throughout Europe. The communist paradise of Munster attracted thousands of armed Anabaptists from Ger- many and Holland, and eventually a war broke out between the Munster rebels and the surrounding cities. Matthijs was killed in one of the early battles, and Bokelson took command. He established a dictatorship (in the name of equality), and issued an order for what was by now a standard Anabaptist/socialist tradi- tion: Polygamy (or, more technically, wife-sharing; as Frederick Engels observed, “It is a curious fact that in every large revolutionary movement the question of ‘free love’ comes to the foreground”). No woman was allowed to be exempt, either-there was a law against being unmarried, which meant that every girl of “marriageable age” was forced to be passed around among the men. Every woman became fair game for an anabaptist’s lust. All this led, understandably, to rapes, suicides, and severe punishments; mass executions took place almost every day. (On one notable occasion, Bokelson himself beheaded a virtuous woman who had refused his sexual advances. As he ceremoniously chopped her head off in the public square, a choir of his wives sang “Glory to God in the Highest.”) This went on for a year and a half, until the city was captured at last by the orthodox forces, who put Bokelson and his lieutenants to death for their crimes- crimes committed in the name of love, equality, and spirituality.

Shafarevich observes another very curious fact about Muntzer and Bokelson: they became the first “in a long list of revolutionary leaders” to break completely under defeat. When the end came, both Muntzer and Bokelson ran for cover (Bokelson hid in a tower, which is mildly amusing in light of the fact that, just before the city fell, he had ordered all towers to be destroyed, on the grounds that they were unfairly “superior” to other buildings; identical orders, incidentally, were issued-but not carried out during the French Revolution). When they were caught, the socialist leaders confessed, informed on their confederates, and begged for their lives to be spared. “This strange and contradictory figure will reappear in subsequent historical epochs. He is a man of seemingly inexhaustible energy when successful, but a pitiful and terrified nonentity the moment his luck turns against him.” Shafarevich explains: “An ideology that is hostile to human personality cannot serve as a point of suppport for it.”

I have necessarily omitted a great deal of Shafarevich’s material on this subject, and he has by no means told the whole story. Many other groups, with stories just as horrifying, could be mentioned, along with the various cults that served as links between pagan religions and the Anabaptist heresies. The definitive his- tory of the Anabaptist/socialist heresy has not yet been written, and it may be that the Church will never grow up until that history becomes widely known. For example, some Christian groups today regard movements such as the Donatists, the Paulicians, the Bogomils, the Petrobrusians, and the Albigenses as “forerunners of the Reformation,” or some such nonsense. They were not. They were heretical, socialist, revolutionary cults, outside the Christian faith. In truth, the Reformation was resolutely opposed to socialism and Anabaptism, because the Reformers believed, taught, and practiced the law of God. They believed it was wrong to murder, fornicate, and steal. The Anabaptists, having rejected “blueprints” and thus freed from the law, came to regard these abominations as marks of sanctification. It is no wonder that the English Reformers specifically repudiated Anabaptist socialism in their official confession of faith, the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion. Article XXXVIII reads:

The Riches and Goods of Christians are not common, as touching the right, title, and possession of the same; as certain Anabaptists do falsely boast. Notwithstanding, every man ought, of such things as he possesseth, liberally to give alms to the poor, according to his ability.

While some scholars regard the Anabaptist movement as a product of the Reformation era, Shafarevich argues (correctly, I believe) that Anabaptism has been a unified heresy throughout the history of the Christian Church: “A striking picture emerges of a movement that lasted for fifteen centuries…. A precisely fixed set of religious ideas affecting the general attitude toward life was preserved virtually unchanged, often down to the smallest detail… The heretical movement, thoroughly hostile to the surrounding world, flares up from time to time with an all-consuming blaze of hatred.”

One obvious objection to all this, of course, would be that the Anabaptist tradition is one of pacifism, not violence; thus it is unfair, and slanderous, to lump the peaceful Anabaptists together with these bloodthirsty revolutionaries. There’s only one problem with that argument: the facts. For the bloodthirsty revolutionaries we have been discussing were pacifists! Some groups even had theological positions against the killing of animals- yet they would suddenly explode into some of the most violent orgies of destruction and mass murder known in history. “The two extremes [pacifism and violence] of the heretical movement were closely interwoven; they cannot be clearly distinguished. At times, infact, a sect switched from one extreme to the other overnight.” Shafarevich cites numerous examples of this phenomenon, and concludes: “Apparently it was possible for a sect to exist in two states, ‘militant’ and ‘peaceful,’ and the transition from one state to the other could happen suddenly, and for all practical purposes instantaneously.”

Anabaptism socialism was not a movement for reform or improvement; rather, it called for utter destruction of the Church, and indeed of the earth itself. In its fervor to establish total equality, it rejected all individuality and hierarchy, ultimately declaring that man was equal to God. The nineteenth-century historian Johann von Dollinger concluded: “Each heretical doctrine that appeared in the Middle Ages bore, in open or concealed form, a revolutionary character; in other words, had it come to power, it would have been obliged to destroy the existing state structure and implement a political and social revolution. The gnostic sects, Cathars and Albigenses, who provoked the severe and implacable medieval laws against heresies by their activities, and with whom a bloody struggle was carried on, were socialist and communist. They attacked marriage, the family and property. Had they been victorious, the result would have been a traumatic social dislocation and a relapse into barbarism.

But they were not victorious. They failed. Socialism parading as radical Christianity was shown to be a pious-sounding fraud. Orthodoxy had demonstrated that there can never be any such thing as “Christian Socialism,” because socialism is antichrist. And so the tactics changed. Socialism went secular, and it went underground as well, dropping the theological approach and turning to an avowedly autonomous, philosophical rationale instead.

It is striking that the two great opponents of that era- Reformed orthodoxy and the Anabaptist heresy- resurfaced in our age at the same time. In 1973 (the year of the socialistic, blueprint-denying Humanist Manifesto II), Ronald Sider and his Anabaptist/socialist colleagues (at least some of whom, at this writing, are still pacifists) issued the Chicago Declaration of Evangelical Social Concern, which brought a forthright demand for Christian socialism to the attention of Christians across the country. In the very same year, two Reformed works were published which will mean the eventual defeat of Christian socialism in our day as well: R. J. Rushdoony’s Institutes of Biblical Law and Gary North’s Introduction to Christian Economics. Just as, according to tradition, Pelagius and Augustine were born in the same year (354), so God again has brought the poison and its antidote into the world simultaneously.

Excerpted From Productive Christians in an Age of Guilt Manipulators

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Halloween Unmasked: Should Christians Celebrate Halloween? http://chiltoncenter.org/halloween-unmasked/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 21:17:41 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=79 This talk was archived as, “Halloween Unmasked” and was preached from the pulpit of Reformation Bible Church in Anaheim, California. Starting from the Bible, Rev. Chilton goes through the dangers of the occult and its relation to demonic activity. Rev. Chilton did not observe Halloween and urged his congregation to do the same. He warned […]

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This talk was archived as, “Halloween Unmasked” and was preached from the pulpit of Reformation Bible Church in Anaheim, California.

Starting from the Bible, Rev. Chilton goes through the dangers of the occult and its relation to demonic activity. Rev. Chilton did not observe Halloween and urged his congregation to do the same. He warned that the “cute” part of Halloween was as dangerous as the witches and goblins.

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This talk was archived as, “Halloween Unmasked” and was preached from the pulpit of Reformation Bible Church in Anaheim, California. Starting from the Bible, Rev. Chilton goes through the dangers of the occult and its relation to demonic activity. This talk was archived as, “Halloween Unmasked” and was preached from the pulpit of Reformation Bible Church in Anaheim, California. Starting from the Bible, Rev. Chilton goes through the dangers of the occult and its relation to demonic activity. Rev. Chilton did not observe Halloween and urged his congregation to do the same. He warned […] The Rev. David Chilton Center 34:46
On Fairy Tales – Rev. David Chilton http://chiltoncenter.org/fairy-tales-rev-david-chilton/ Tue, 10 Sep 2013 00:28:00 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=74 Sometime ago I heard a distinguished lecturer address an audience of home-schooling parents on nonconformity to the world. Much of what he said was worthwhile, but at one point he launched into an attack against fictional children’s literature, especially storylines that were impossible in real life. he especially seemed to have it in for such […]

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Sometime ago I heard a distinguished lecturer address an audience of home-schooling parents on nonconformity to the world. Much of what he said was worthwhile, but at one point he launched into an attack against fictional children’s literature, especially storylines that were impossible in real life. he especially seemed to have it in for such “escapist” literature as the writings of C.S. Lewis and George MacDonald, two of my favorite authors. (In fact, while I’m at it, let me recommend two of MacDonald’s very best books, which should change any grump’s outlook on life: The Princess and the Goblin and At the Back of the North Wind; and two of his best short stories: “The Golden Key,” and “Cross Purposes.”)

I approached him later and asked what he thought of the fiction in the Bible. He stared at me in disbelief. I mentioned the parables of Jesus. Were all of them literally “true”? Or could our Lord have just been making up an illustration to fit the occasion?

Well, he allowed that Jesus might have just made them up. But he protested that all of the parables could have happened in real life. Okay, I said, but what about Biblical stories that couldn’t have happened in real life? He stared at me as if all the rumors about Chilton being “brain dead” were true after all. I hastened to assure him that I believe the whole Bible, cover to cover. But there are examples of the Bible telling stories that aren’t literally “true.” The Book of Revelation, for example, is full of stories that no one believes could really take place. No one teaches that the symbols in the Book of Revelation are really “literal,” regardless of “literalist” claims. No one believes that the Beast (Rev. 13) is really an animal; no one thinks there ever has been or will be a pregnant lady standing on the moon and clothed with the sun (12:1-2); no one understands Satan to be actually “a great red dragon with seven heads” (12:3).

Even according to “literalists,” the sword coming from Christ’s mouth (Rev. 1:16; 19:15) is not literally a sword; Satan’s throne (2:13) is not really a throne; Christ is not literally selling gold, clothing and eyesalve (3:18); and the door at which He is standing and knocking (3:20) is not literally a door!

I could go on and on (and I have, as the author of a 700-page commentary on the book), but most people will acknowledge that Revelation is rather unusual, even for the Bible, and is virtually peppered with symbols. Strange, unearthly creatures appear; a Harlot sits on a scarlet beast getting nations drunk; a King leads an army in striking down the nations of the earth, calling the birds of the air to feast on human flesh.

Well, let’s skip the Book of Revelation; after all, there are whole denominations that specifically prohibit its being read in a formal worship service (even though its author specifically encouraged his recipients to read it in church). The noted lecturer acknowledged that Revelation was a “special case.” But he assured me that never would the Bible countenance the telling of a story such as J.R.R. Tolkien might use, of, say, talking trees. On extremely rare occasions, possibly, an animal might talk (see Numbers 22)—but trees, never. Such a story, therefore, represents dissatisfaction with God’s wise design: a rebellious attempt to overthrow God’s created order.

Pontificating is always dangerous, especially if you don’t know your Bible well enough to pull it off convincingly. I stopped him cold with one of my favorite Bible passages, Judges 9:7-15, Jotham’s parable of the trees, where all the trees of the forest gather together to elect a king—and, in true democratic fashion, they choose the least qualified, most unproductive candidate, who ends up tyrannizing them. The parable is actually a rather Libertarian exhortation for free, responsible self-government, couched in patently ridiculous terms if taken literally—which, clearly, it is not meant to be.

My point in all this is not to suggest that all fairy tales are suitable for children. Some fairy tales, especially modern ones, are unsuitable for anybody. But most classical fairy tales have in common a sense of wonder at the world, a conviction that the universe is really made of breathtaking, eye-popping wonders, throbbing and teeming with miraculous life in every aspect of its being. They also point to the fundamental Truth that underlies all reality, expressed in the blind, human gropings for our Creator (Acts 17:27), stemming from all men’s sense that God has placed “eternity in their hearts” (Ecc. 3:11).

At root, the Christian Story is the true fairy tale: the greatest bedtime story, the ultimate Happy Ending, where the Champion overcomes and the poor peasant girl, rescued by the handsome Prince, is taken to His kingdom to live happily ever after.

[Archive Note from cFairy-Tale-Castle-fairy-tales-and-fables-5123629-1600-1200ontributor Carmon Friedrich: More which is not original from me, but excellent reading. It was written by our friend David Chilton. This is a draft of an article which David gave us, which was later published (many years ago) in World Magazine. Steve had taken David to a homeschool conference in Fremont, to see his friend Gary DeMar who was the keynote speaker. David wrote this in response to another speaker there, who didn’t realize that David Chilton with half his brain tied behind his back (because of anoxia from his heart attack) was still quite a force to be reckoned with. And I end this post with one of David’s favorite verses, the signature to this article he printed out for us to read, the ultimate Happy Ending: “They shall not hurt nor destroy in all My Holy Mountain: for the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the LORD, as the waters cover the sea!” ~Isaiah 11:9] 

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Battlefield Apologetics http://chiltoncenter.org/battlefield-apologetics/ http://chiltoncenter.org/battlefield-apologetics/#comments Tue, 03 Sep 2013 18:49:33 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=70 Rev. Chilton followed the legacy of Dr. Cornelius Van Til in the presuppositional school of Christian apologetics. This school believes the Christian faith is the only basis for rational thought. It presupposes that the Bible is divine revelation and attempts to expose flaws in other worldviews. This Van Tillian style of apologetics claims that there […]

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Apologetics David Chilton Album Cover

Rev. Chilton followed the legacy of Dr. Cornelius Van Til in the presuppositional school of Christian apologetics. This school believes the Christian faith is the only basis for rational thought. It presupposes that the Bible is divine revelation and attempts to expose flaws in other worldviews.

This Van Tillian style of apologetics claims that there are valid arguments to prove that the God of the Bible exists but that the unbeliever would not necessarily be persuaded by them because of his suppression of the truth, and therefore the apologist, he said, must present the truth regardless of whether anyone is actually persuaded by it.

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http://chiltoncenter.org/battlefield-apologetics/feed/ 1 Rev. Chilton followed the legacy of Dr. Cornelius Van Til in the presuppositional school of Christian apologetics. This school believes the Christian faith is the only basis for rational thought. It presupposes that the Bible is divine revelation and a... Rev. Chilton followed the legacy of Dr. Cornelius Van Til in the presuppositional school of Christian apologetics. This school believes the Christian faith is the only basis for rational thought. It presupposes that the Bible is divine revelation and attempts to expose flaws in other worldviews. This Van Tillian style of apologetics claims that there […] The Rev. David Chilton Center 1:00:35
Baptism By Sprinkling http://chiltoncenter.org/baptism-sprinkling/ Tue, 27 Aug 2013 09:47:56 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=65 Rev. David Chilton discusses the doctrine of Baptism as it relates to mode. That is, how are we to perform baptism? Is it by immersion, sprinkling, or pouring? Do we make up our own way to come to God or does God have a standard in His Word?

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David Chilton

Rev. David Chilton discusses the doctrine of Baptism as it relates to mode. That is, how are we to perform baptism? Is it by immersion, sprinkling, or pouring?

Do we make up our own way to come to God or does God have a standard in His Word?

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Rev. David Chilton discusses the doctrine of Baptism as it relates to mode. That is, how are we to perform baptism? Is it by immersion, sprinkling, or pouring? Do we make up our own way to come to God or does God have a standard in His Word? Rev. David Chilton discusses the doctrine of Baptism as it relates to mode. That is, how are we to perform baptism? Is it by immersion, sprinkling, or pouring? Do we make up our own way to come to God or does God have a standard in His Word? The Rev. David Chilton Center 1:01:40
The Great Tribulation http://chiltoncenter.org/great-tribulation/ Tue, 27 Aug 2013 06:43:28 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=58 About The Great Tribulation Are we living in the Last Days? Are the signs of our times the Signs of the End? Is the Great Tribulation just around the corner? For almost three generations evangelical Christians have answered these questions with an unequivocal “YES”! In this challenging new book by David Chilton, all the prophetic […]

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About The Great Tribulation

Are we living in the Last Days? Are the signs of our times the Signs of the End? Is the Great Tribulation just around the corner?
For almost three generations evangelical Christians have answered these questions with an unequivocal “YES”!
In this challenging new book by David Chilton, all the prophetic passages of Scripture dealing with the End Times are re-examined with careful attention to every revealing detail. And his conclusions are nearly as startling as the prophesies themselves.
The Great Tribulation is the kind of sane, balanced, and easy to understand introduction to End Times theology that Christians have needed from a long, long time.

For centuries, Christian have sought to interpret the Bible’s scriptural meaning – often erroneously assigning modern ideology to scriptural passages. This is perhaps the most comprehensive and easily understood writing available on this cataclysmic event “which so many Christians are awaiting.” As Chilton proves however, it will be a long wait, since this event occurred in A.D. 70. This book is also an excellent tool for modern man in learning how Scripture interprets Scripture.

Download The Great Tribulation


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Download The Great Tribulation

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Days of Vengeance http://chiltoncenter.org/days-of-vengeance/ Tue, 27 Aug 2013 05:58:55 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=42 About Days of Vengeance The Days of Vengeance is an extraordinary exposition of the book of Revelation and will undoubtedly be welcomed as a cool drenching rain upon a dry, thirsty ground. Long parched and impoverished by speculative spectacularization, the evangelical scholastic wilderness can do naught but soak in Chilton’s careful and literate commentary. The […]

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About Days of Vengeance

The Days of Vengeance is an extraordinary exposition of the book of Revelation and will undoubtedly be welcomed as a cool drenching rain upon a dry, thirsty ground. Long parched and impoverished by speculative spectacularization, the evangelical scholastic wilderness can do naught but soak in Chilton’s careful and literate commentary.

The Days of Vengeance is phenomenal. It is big (nearly 750 pages big, going where no commentary has dared to go before). It is brash (marshalling mountains of long forgotten evidence to the cause). It is a brazen bravura, a delight, a tour de force.
If you have a “must read list,” put this book at the top of that list. If you don’t have such a list, start one. And start here, with The Days of Vengeance.
-George Grant

Keys the Book of Revelation

From the very beginning, cranks and crackpots have attempted to use Revelation to advocate some new twist on the Chicken Little Doctrine: “The Sky Is Falling!” But, as David Chilton shows in this careful, detailed exposition, St. John’s Apocalypse teaches instead that Christians will overcome all opposition through the work of Jesus Christ. Most of the confusion over the meaning of the prophecy has resulted from a failure to apply five crucial interpretive keys to the Book of Revelation.

  • 1. Revelation is the most “Biblical” book in the Bible. St. John quotes hundreds of passages from the Old Testament, often with subtle allusions to little-known rituals of the Ancient Near East. In order to understand Revelation, we need to know our Bibles backward and forward (or, at least, own a commentary that explains it!).
  • 2. Revelation is a prophecy about imminent events – events that were about to break loose on the world of the first century. Revelation is not about nuclear warfare, space travel, or the end of the world. Again and again it specifically warns that “the time is near!” Revelation cannot be understood unless this fundamental fact is taken seriously.
  • 3. Revelation has a system of symbolism. Everyone recognized that St. John wrote his message in symbols. But the meaning of those symbols is not up for grabs. There is a systematic structure in Biblical symbolism. in order to understand Revelation properly, we must become familiar with the “language” in which it is written.
  • 4. Revelation is a worship service. St. John did not write a textbook on prophecy. Instead, he recorded a heavenly worship service in progress. One of his major concerns, if fact, is that the worship of God is central to everything in life. It is the most important thing we do.
  • 5. Revelation is a book about dominion. Revelation is not a book about how terrible the Antichrist is, or how powerful the devil is. It is, as the very first verse says, “The revelation of Jesus Christ.” It tells us about His lordship over all; it tells us about our salvation and victory in the New Covenant, God’s “wonderful plan for our life”; it tells us that the kingdom of the world has become the Kingdom of our God, and of His Christ; and it tells us that He shall reign forever and ever.

Most Comprehensive Revelation Study

This is quite possibly the most comprehensive verse by verse treatment of the Book of Revelation ever written. David Chilton has tackled what Calvin and Luther never even attempted. Following in the train of thought of his Paradise Restored, Chilton sees the Church triumphant to the end with Satan defeated at the return of Christ. The Apostle John presents a vision of victorious Christians who overcome all opposition through the work of Jesus Christ. Chilton asserts that for too long the Church has labored under the delusion that failure is her only role in the world. An inviting, yet non-threatening commentary for the layman as well as the scholar.

 

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Paradise Restored http://chiltoncenter.org/paradise-restored/ Tue, 27 Aug 2013 05:30:42 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=45 About Paradise Restored Does the Bible teach Christians to expect victory or defeat in this world? In this powerful book, David Chilton sets forth extensive biblical evidence for the historic Christian view know as postmillennialism – the teaching that, before the Second Coming of Christ, the world will be successfully evangelized and discipled to Christianity. […]

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About Paradise Restored

Does the Bible teach Christians to expect victory or defeat in this world? In this powerful book, David Chilton sets forth extensive biblical evidence for the historic Christian view know as postmillennialism – the teaching that, before the Second Coming of Christ, the world will be successfully evangelized and discipled to Christianity. The author emphasized that our view of the future is inescapably bound up with our view of Jesus Christ. The fact that Jesus is now King of kings and Lord of lords means that His Gospel must be victorious: The Holy Spirit will bring the water of life to the ends of the earth. The Christian message is one of Hope: Pentecost was just the beginning.

Charles Spurgeon

“It would be easy to show that at our present rate of progress the kingdoms of this world never could become the kingdom of our Lord and of His Christ. Indeed, many in the Church are giving up the idea of it except on the occasion of the advent of Christ, which, as it chimes in with our own idleness, is likely to be a popular doctrine. I myself believe that King Jesus will reign, and the idols be utterly abolished; but I expect the same power which turned the world upside down once will still continue to do it. The Holy Ghost would never suffer the imputation to rest upon His holy name that He was not able to convert the world.”
-Charles Haddon Spurgeon

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Productive Christians in an Age of Guilt Manipulators http://chiltoncenter.org/productive-christians-in-an-age-of-guilt-manipulators/ Sat, 24 Aug 2013 09:41:11 +0000 http://chiltoncenter.org/?p=12 Description If Pope John Paul II is really interested in dealing with heretical “liberation theologians” in his church, then he ought to issue this third edition of Productive Christians as a Papal encyclical. Protestants have trouble with their own liberation theologians. Some of them are Marxists in the Lamb’s clothing, while others are merely Fabian socialists in […]

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Description

If Pope John Paul II is really interested in dealing with heretical “liberation theologians” in his church, then he ought to issue this third edition of Productive Christians as a Papal encyclical.

Protestants have trouble with their own liberation theologians. Some of them are Marxists in the Lamb’s clothing, while others are merely Fabian socialists in the Lamb’s clothing. Some of them just aren’t willing to say…yet. (Tactics, you understand.) Ron Sider belongs to the third group.

Background

Sider’s first edition of Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger created a minor sensation in conservative Protestant circles. It was the cutting edge of a radical shift of political and economic opinion in the neo-evangelical world, especially on college and seminary campuses-a shift to the far left. The book received no response until 1981, when the first edition of Productive Christians blew away Sider’s claims that he was simply applying the Bible to economics. Sider has never recovered intellectually, as Chilton’s third edition demonstrates.

Sider’s desperate attempts to “cover his flanks” in the second edition of Rich Christians are exposed by this book as a last ditch effort. Sider waffles, Sider squirms, Sider drops whole sections of the original book, Sider changes a few words and quietly shifts controversial sections (exposed in Chilton’s earlier editions) to other chapters, but still nothing works. There is no place left for Sider to hide. Chilton makes it clear: Sider understand neither the Bible nor economics when it comes to his conclusions about profits, taxes, foreign aid, and Western guilt for the Third World poverty.

To put it bluntly, this book definitely destroys what little was left of Sider’s position. The Sider phenomenon, intellectually speaking, is finished. This book is its gravestone.

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